home liquidation demolition environmental future use tenders health and safety slag contact

Environmental
Design and
Management
Limited

Land Use Plan &
Re-development
Strategy






 
 


2.1.3


Employment Trends Within CBRM

 

 

The economic history of the CBRM is well known to the community and almost anyone living in Nova Scotia. The details of the absolute and relative decline of the CBRM are less important to this plan other than the fact they have been on-going since shortly after 1961. However, what is not well known is the extent to which the CBRM has successfully weathered the major economic restructuring of the last 30 years.
Table 2.1 presents data that indicate trends in population and employment in CBRM.

Table 2.1 Employment and Population History of the CBRM.
Year

Population*

Total Employment

Total Change

Steel & Coal Jobs

Steel & Coal Change

1970

129,300

44,798

N/A

7,590

N/A

1975

128,200

47,813

3,015

6,298

(1,295)

1980

127,200

50,835

3,022

6,859

561

1985

124,400

48,270

(2,565)

5,450

(1,409)

1990

120,800

48,551

281

3,939

(1,511)

1995

118,200

45,355

(3,156)

2,858

(1,081)

2000 Estimate #^

110,983

45,405

80

2,300

(558)

1970 - 2000

-14.2%

1.4%

637

-69.7%

(5,290)

Sources:
The Cape Breton Region Municipality at the End of the 20th Century," CBRM, Planning Department, 1999.
SYSCO.
Cape Breton Development Corporation (DEVCO).
Statistics Canada; Labour Force Survey, Census 1961, 71, 76, 81, 86, 91, 96, 01.
Dillon Consulting.
* Inter-census estimates extrapolated from Census year populations.
# Based on extrapolation of 1996 - 2001 trend.
^ Based on annual (real) rate of change, 1970 - 1995
& employment is the number of persons reporting employment during the calendar year

Although the population of CBRM has declined by 14.2% since 1970, total employment has stayed relatively flat (a 1.4% increase). However, as the column on the far right indicates, during this same period, steel and coal industries shed a total of 5,290 jobs.

From 1970 to 2000, all of the lost jobs in the steel and coal industry were replaced by new jobs in other sectors. After factoring out the steel and coal sectors, the rest of the economy (manufacturing, telecommunications, etc.) produced a growth rate of about 0.5% per year from 1970 to 2000.
Table 2.2 presents additional evidence that the employment situation in CBRM has been fairly stable.


 
  Table 2.2 Employment Per Capita and Employment Income in CBRM.

 

Year

 

Population*

Employment per Capita&

Income Per Employee
(2000 $)

Total Employment Income Millions
(2000 $)

1970

129,300

0.348

$20,985

$939.9

1975 Estimate

128,200

0.373

$22,930

$1,096.4

1980

127,200

0.400

$24,874

$1,264.4

1985

124,400

0.388

$22,758

$1,098.5

1990

120,800

0.402

$24,667

$1,197.6

1995

118,200

0.383

$21,474

$973.9

2000 Estimate

110,983

0.409

$21,648

$982.9

1970 - 2000

-14.2%

17.6%

3.2%

4.6%

Sources: Same as Table 2.1

 
 

By dividing the total population of the municipality by the total number of jobs in the economy, one can calculate the ratio of employment per capita. From 1970 to 2000, this ratio has fluctuated from a low of 0.348 jobs per person to a high of 0.409 in 2000.

The CBRM economy has replaced the jobs lost from the steel and coal sectors with jobs in other sectors. The jobs lost were high paying industrial jobs. How do the new jobs compare in terms of purchasing power? The answer can be seen in the fourth column of Table 2.2 - Income Per Employee (2000 $). This shows the aver-age income per employee in CBRM adjusted for inflation. During the 30 year period from 1970 to 2000, the average income level of an employee in CBRM has increased marginally from $20,985 to $21,648, although this is down from a peak of $24,874 in 1980.

The fact that the CBRM economy was able to "tread water" while it lost almost 5,300 jobs from its traditional economic base (steel and coal) suggests there is hope for the economic future of the region. In our opinion, there is no reason to believe that this underlying job generation will stop now that the last steel and coal jobs are gone. This fact stands in contrast to many other mining communities in Canada, where when the mines shut down and there is no other long-term economic future.


 
next top previous

 
home   |   liquidation   |   demolition   |   environmental   |   future use   |   tenders   |   health & safety   |   contactprivacy